Thursday, May 03, 2012

Half Dose #104: Neurological Center


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[All images courtesy MAD; Photos are by Ty Cole]

On a tree-lined Upper East Side street, Matiz Architecture & Design (MAD) have expanded a five-story townhouse into a seven-story building serving NY Neurological Associates. Like many Manhattan renovations, the building is like a mullet: business in the front, party in the back.

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What is going on with the rear addition is visible from the street on the top-floor addition: patina-copper panels extend back and down the building, an L-shaped wrapper over and behind the brick-and-stone existing building.

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The copper panels give MAD's design its most striking characteristic, but of course it's not the only story. The horizontal windows set into the deep-profile, copper wall provide plenty of sunlight (this elevation faces south) for the various rooms.

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Nevertheless I'm drawn to the copper skin, the way the patina is subtly but noticeably irregular, evident in these photos, particularly the close-up below.

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The interior is a simple palette of drywall and wood. I especially like the cutouts in the surfaces, be it the lights, skylights, or the magazine racks with their sloped fronts. Only in New York would a waiting room be squeezed into a hallway!

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Last but not least, the design provides three outdoor terraces: one is located in the rear yard, above a lower level; the other two are atop the building, one facing north and one facing south (photo below). Spaces like this are a wonderful amenity in Manhattan.

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5 comments:

  1. Beautiful and smart project. Congratulations!

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  2. I am so thankful for the mullet reference!

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  3. The addition is beautifully & sensitively slotted into/onto the existing building...I love how the contrasting copper, with its inherent patina, enlarges the structure so discreetly.

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  4. Love this concept of "business in the front and party at the back". The terraces are a great bonus too.

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  5. Architecture as mullet. Mulletism will be the next big architectural style.

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