My recent posts at World-Architects

      

Monday, November 10, 2014

Today's archidose #795

Here are some of my photos of Fulton Center (opened November 10, 2014) in New York City by Arup and Grimshaw Architects with the "Sky Reflector-Net" by James Carpenter Design Associates.

Corner of Fulton and Broadway with Corbin Building (corner of John and Broadway) on the right:
Fulton Center

Looking west down Fulton toward the World Trade Center site:
Fulton Center

Entrance at Fulton and Broadway with atrium drum popping above the glass-box parapet:
Fulton Center

The gap between the glass box and the atrium:
Fulton Center

Looking toward the atrium from near the entrance along Broadway:
Fulton Center

Getting closer to the atrium:
Fulton Center

A view across the atrium to the Broadway/Fulton entrance with the lower edge of the Sky Reflector-Net visible:
Fulton Center

Looking up at the atrium oculus from one level below the street (bottom of escalators in above photo):
Fulton Center

The same view from two levels below the street, looking through a circular opening in the floor above:
Fulton Center

An escalator cuts through part of the old Corbin Building to give access to...
Fulton Center

...the Dey Street Concourse that connects Fulton Center to the R Train:
Fulton Center

To contribute your Flickr images for consideration, just:
:: Join and add photos to the archidose pool
To contribute your Instagram images for consideration, just:
:: Tag your photos #archidose

5 comments:

  1. reminiscent of jahn's state of illinois center!

    ReplyDelete
  2. wait...the $1.4 Billion Fulton transportation hub and the $4 Billion WTC tranportation hub are next to each other?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pretty much. They're one block from each other, Fulton Center on Broadway and PATH on Church Street. This diagram shows their proximity.

      Delete
  3. Only one block? how lazy are americans?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I'm sure you know the answer to that question, but keep in mind that the PATH station serves people in New Jersey, while the Fulton Center serves people in the rest of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. Having an underground connection between the two is helpful. Having the two in one station might have been ideal, but that's a major transportation infrastructure ordeal rather than an architectural issue.

      Delete

Comments are moderated for spam.