Sunday, November 23, 2014

2014 Holiday Gift Books, 1 of 4

This year I'm presenting a selection of 40 holiday gift books from the same number of publishers, presented alphabetically in chunks of 10. The book covers provide more information and links to Amazon, while the book titles are linked to the publishers' websites. Some none-too-serious recommendations of who might like the titles are indicated. See the others here.

For the creative (co)worker:

a+t 43: Workforce: A Better Place to Work
a+t research group
a+t
Paperback, 160 pages

For the naturalist:

Animal Architecture
Ingo Arndt
Abrams
Hardcover, 160 pages

For the aural architect:

Shape of Sound
Victoria Meyers
Artifice Books on Architecture
Hardcover, 144 pages

For the phenomenologist:

Architectural Atmospheres: On the Experience and Politics of Architecture
Christian Borch, editor (contributions by Böhme, Eliasson, Pallasmaa)
Birkhäuser
Hardcover, 112 pages

For the beginner:

Conditional Design: An introduction to elemental architecture
Anthony di Mari
BIS Publishers
Paperback, 160 pages

For the Eurocentric history buff:

The Morphology of the Times European Cities and their Historical Growth
Ton Hinse
DOM Publishers
Paperback, 304 pages

For the techno-theorist:

Paradigms in Computing: Making, Machines, and Models for Design Agency in Architecture
Edited by David Jason Gerber, Mariana Ibanez
eVolo
Hardcover, 408 pages

For the eternal dreamer:

Imagine Architecture: Artistic Visions of the Urban Realm
Lukas Feireiss, Robert Klanten, editors
Gestalten
Hardcover, 240 pages

For the landscape artist:

Composite Landscapes: Photomontage and Landscape Architecture
Edited by Charles Waldheim, Andrea Hansen
Hatje Cantz
Hardcover, 176 pages

For the Mies disciple:

Last Is More: Mies, IBM and the Transformation of Chicago
Robert Sharoff, William Zbaren
Images Publishing
Hardcover, 160 pages

Friday, November 21, 2014

Today's archidose #798

Here are some photos of the Roman Temple of Diana Environments (2011) in Merida, Spain, by José María Sánchez García Architects, photographed by Gonzalo Mauleón.

ROMAN TEMPLE OF DIANA ENVIRONMENTS IN MERIDA

ROMAN TEMPLE OF DIANA ENVIRONMENTS IN MERIDA

ROMAN TEMPLE OF DIANA ENVIRONMENTS IN MERIDA

ROMAN TEMPLE OF DIANA ENVIRONMENTS IN MERIDA

ROMAN TEMPLE OF DIANA ENVIRONMENTS IN MERIDA

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Thursday, November 20, 2014

Interactive Tour: Bushwick Inlet Park


New York City has seen many physical changes in the last couple decades, but none as dramatic as what is taking place along its once industrial waterfronts. Abandoned piers and waterfront land has become the site for new parks along the East River in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. A stretch of the Williamsburg waterfront in Brooklyn has also seen the creation of waterfront housing that has, combined with the neighborhood’s rapid gentrification, created a desire for open space, part of it satiated by the Bushwick Inlet Park, designed by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects with Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners.

Click on the photograph below to launch the interactive tour of Bushwick Inlet Park.


Monday, November 17, 2014

Today's archidose #797

Here are some photos of the Departments Of Law And Central Administration, Vienna University of Economics and Business (2014) in Vienna, Austria, by Crab Studio (Cook Robotham Architectural Bureau), photographed by Sebastian Deptula.

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

D3 AD

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Friday, November 14, 2014

Book Review: Nordic Light

Nordic Light: Modern Scandinavian Architecture by Henry Plummer
Thames & Hudson, 2014
Paperback, 256 pages



Last year I included Henry Plummer's Cosmos of Light, a record of three religious buildings designed by Le Corbusier, in my list of notable books of 2013 at Designers & Books. I must admit that even though Plummer contributes both the words and the photographs, be it Cosmos of Light or Nordic Light, the subject of this review, it's the photographs that sway me toward a deep liking of his books. While Plummer's love of what he is documenting in words and images is clear, I find his text flowery, full of adjectives that are trying really hard to convey the qualities of light that come across in particular buildings or places. But I'd argue that his photographs convey those qualities so much better; such is the skill of his shooting, particularly his framing and his patience in waiting for the right light. The cover of Nordic Light – Kaija and Heikki Sirén's Student Chapel in Otaniemi, Finland (1957) – makes this much clear.


[Juha Leiviskä's Myyrmäki Church in Vantaa, Finland, 1984]

In this coffee table book, available both in hardcover and paperback, Plummer documents 45 buildings in Scandinavia, with 14 in Denmark, 22 in Finland, 5 in Norway, and 4 in Sweden. The buildings are split into nine thematic chapters that describe how the architecture in these northern countries responds to the conditions of sunlight: whiteness, rhythm, journey, carving, forest, transparency, tranquility, diffusion, and darkness. While these chapters are listed in the table of contents, the buildings are not, meaning the book is a voyage of discovery more than a reference for highlighting particular buildings. This goes hand in hand with Plummer's patient and almost meditative way of photographing and discussing the projects. Not surprisingly, as is hinted in the cover photo and two other photos included here, Plummer has something for churches, which populate the book in large numbers. This makes sense, given that churches are an architectural typology ripe for exploring the literal and metaphorical role of light, and therefore they are perfect for Plummer's studied lens.


[Matti Sanaksenaho's St. Henry's Chapel in Turku, Finland, 2005]

Purchase at Amazon: Buy from Amazon.com

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Today's archidose #796

Here are some photos of the ARoS Art Museum (2004) in Aarhus, Denmark, by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, capped by Olafur Eliasson's Your rainbow panorama (2011), and photographed by Sindre Ellingsen.

Aros art museum

Aros art museum

Aros art museum

Aros art museum

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Monday, November 10, 2014

The Next Glass Walkway?

First in the recent trend of glass walkways came the Grand Canyon Skywalk (2007):

[Photo from Grand Canyon National Park]

Then The Ledge at Willis Tower's Skydeck (2009):

[Photo from Skydeck website]

And this year came the Eiffel Tower:

[Photo from Tour Eiffel]

And the Tower Bridge:

[Photo from Tower Bridge Exhibition]

So what will be the next trendy, vertigo-inducing glass walkway attraction?

A logical site would be the Gateway Arch in St. Louis:

[Background image from Together We Roam]

But why not an Amazon warehouse?

[Background photo from Newsweek]

Or even the Oval Office?

[Background photo from White House Museum]

What would you want to see from above through a glass walkway?

Today's archidose #795

Here are some of my photos of Fulton Center (opened November 10, 2014) in New York City by Arup and Grimshaw Architects with the "Sky Reflector-Net" by James Carpenter Design Associates.

Corner of Fulton and Broadway with Corbin Building (corner of John and Broadway) on the right:
Fulton Center

Looking west down Fulton toward the World Trade Center site:
Fulton Center

Entrance at Fulton and Broadway with atrium drum popping above the glass-box parapet:
Fulton Center

The gap between the glass box and the atrium:
Fulton Center

Looking toward the atrium from near the entrance along Broadway:
Fulton Center

Getting closer to the atrium:
Fulton Center

A view across the atrium to the Broadway/Fulton entrance with the lower edge of the Sky Reflector-Net visible:
Fulton Center

Looking up at the atrium oculus from one level below the street (bottom of escalators in above photo):
Fulton Center

The same view from two levels below the street, looking through a circular opening in the floor above:
Fulton Center

An escalator cuts through part of the old Corbin Building to give access to...
Fulton Center

...the Dey Street Concourse that connects Fulton Center to the R Train:
Fulton Center

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