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Wednesday, July 21, 2010

NPNY2010

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[photos by archidose]

Last week was the opening of the New Practices New York 2010 exhibition at the Center for Architecture. 'Twas a fun and crowded opening party.

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Winners of the AIA New York Chapters's biannual competition include:
Archipelagos
EASTON + COMBS (highest honor winner)
LEONG LEONG
MANIFOLD
SOFTlab
SO-IL (Solid Objectives - Idenburg Liu)
TACKLEBOX
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The exhibition in the Center's lowest level was designed by LEVENBETTS, and it is unique for splitting the contents of each firm's presentation into three areas. A grouping of videos is along one wall; opposite are black and white supergraphics; the room in the back includes table and wall space for models. Below are a some shots from the last.

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[SO-IL]

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[TACKLEBOX]

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[SOFTlab]

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[LEONG LEONG]

The above smattering of models shows a predilection for fields, atypical projects and presentation, and architecture as an armature for an expanded oeuvre. A comparison with this year's Architectural League Prize is apt: Both target young architects and both are featuring projects that veer from the traditional realm of architecture: buildings. This isn't to say that the seven NPNY and six archleague offices don't or wouldn't undertake building projects, but buildings are not the defining characteristic of most or even all of the offices. This reflects the diversification of young practices today (towards being recession-proof), the broadening scope of architecture and education explored by Rem Koolhaas and others, and the networking of practices and individuals that departs from the traditional office/studio setup. In particular I appreciate the emphasis on the small-scale, the tangible interactive pieces of environments, be it an installation, interior renovation or even--dare I say--a building.

2 comments:

  1. >>>I appreciate the emphasis on the small-scale, the tangible interactive pieces of environments, be it an installation, interior renovation or even--dare I say--a building.<<<

    ...but you know, this does away with the field of the amateur and the idea of the vernacular in architecture.

    I don't know if its such a good thing.

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  2. Can you explain exactly what you mean, Thomas? Not sure I follow. Considering how traditionally architects account for less than 10% (or is it 5%?) of buildings -- at least in the US -- then I'm not sure how this would be any different. I don't see this group of architects displacing any prevailing DIY undertakings. There's probably room for all.

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