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Sunday, October 27, 2013

Nobel Center Matching Game

UPDATE 11/15: Three finalists have been announced. See my new post to find out all of the entries, or see the bottom of this post for the answer key.

Back in April the Nobel Foundation selected twelve architects to vie for the design of the Nobel Center in Stockholm. Eleven of the firms (minus Herzog & de Meuron) submitted designs at the end of September, and each of them can be viewed on the Nobel Center website. Oh, and each entry is anonymous. According to the website: "The jury will not comment on any proposal until 2-5 of them in November 2013 have been selected to proceed to the competitions [sic] second stage. The names of the architects behind each submission will at that point be revealed." Below are the proposals, followed by the list of the architects at bottom. So which architect goes with which proposal?

Design Proposals (in alphabetical order):

A. Archipelago:


B. Beyond 1210:


C. Butterfly:


D. Landing Seagulls:


E. Nobelhuset:


F. Nobel Sphere:


G. P(a)lace to Enjoy, A:


H. PRISM:


I. Room and a Half, A:


J. Space Between, The:


K. "We believe in...":



Participating Architects (in alphabetical order):
  1. 3XN
  2. BIG
  3. David Chipperfield Architects
  4. Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor
  5. Lacaton and Vassal Architectes
  6. Lundgaard and Tranberg Arkitekter
  7. Marcel Meili, Markus Peter Architekten
  8. OMA
  9. SANAA
  10. Snøhetta
  11. Wingårdhs Arkitekter
    If you care to guess, leave a comment below matching the proposals (letters) and architects (numbers), e.g. A1, B2, etc.

    (Thanks to Fred B. for the idea!)

    UPDATE 11/15: The winning combination:

    A6
    B8
    C1
    D7
    E3
    F9
    G11
    H2
    I4
    J10
    K5

    14 comments:

    1. To get the ball rolling, here are my guesses:

      A6
      B8
      C1
      D4
      E3
      F9
      G11
      H2
      I7
      J10
      K5

      ReplyDelete
    2. Not being familiar with all of them, I'll try:
      B6
      C1
      D2
      E3
      F9
      G11
      H10
      I7
      J8
      K5
      And I really can't figure out who did the A, and I can't find anything that the 4 could have done :P
      I also think that BIG could have suggested the F, too!
      We'll see ^^

      ReplyDelete
    3. A6 because lundgaard and tranberg seem to build stuff on layers
      B8 OMA that's for sure
      C11 Wingårdhs Arkitekter because of the nice curved glass surfaces
      D7 Marcel Meili, Markus Peter Architekten for no reason at all... I don't really know who this is...
      E3 David Chipperfield, one of the easier choices... that rendering of the inside says it all
      F9 SANAA, light and airi+vegetal+white, but they never did spheres before.lol
      G1 3xN because of the facade
      H2 BIG tends to do those raised corners, but the renderings are awful
      I4 guesswork, they seem to do fairly bland stuff and inferior renderings...
      J10 Snohetta because it reminds me of Oslo
      K5 Lacaton Vassal no doubt

      ReplyDelete
    4. Replies
      1. Make that 7 out of 11 correct. Oops! Trust your instincts, El Jiji. : )

        Delete
    5. I'm not even going to try but is it only me that doesn't yet get excited by any of the proposals?

      ReplyDelete
      Replies
      1. Jan - Always hard to tell from one—even two or three—renderings, but I find A and I/K (very similar) appealing.

        Delete
      2. Hmm, I really like the day-time rendering for E ... I would go for that.

        Delete
    6. From ”Summary of Stage 1” by the Nobel Foundation:
      “Feasability:
      Design that takes into consideration the cultural and historical value of the site and national interests.”

      Unfortunately all three winning proposals will, if built, demolish a maritime heritage of cultural and historic value; a customs house built in 1876 and two unique warehouses built in 1910.
      The Customs House has great historical value as a representative of late-19th-century government and administrative buildings in general and of Stockholm’s customs services, in particular. It is a link in the chain of customs houses in Stockholm from different periods and was designed by renowned architect Axel Fredrik Nyström, who was also responsible for the old National Archives building.
      The warehouses from 1910, together with the ground cover of large paving stones, reflect efforts made in the early 20th century to improve customs’ work environment and to create better and more modern storage facilities at the harbours of Stockholm’. Today, the warehouses are unique in Stockholm, since there are no longer any similar warehouses remaining at the harbour of Stockholm.

      ReplyDelete

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